Domobaal Gallery

Curated by David Gates and Neil Gall

2019

Go - No Go  2019    Railing Spear Series  ‘Thomson’s  Go, No Go 1  or  Bronze Spear 1  are playful sculptures of distorted railings which also reference this ambiguity of the customised public sculpture. ( Bronze Spear 1)  Made from a cast of a street railing, reverse the process by turning the vandalised public element into a non-public sculpture. Railings are in fact charged with the paradox of being both public and private delineators at the same time. They are the materialised frontiers of the terrain’s ownership, drawing along cities in lines of spears. Belgian artist Francis Alÿs also commented on “the armor of paranoid London” ("‘Railings’, Francis Alÿs, 2004 | Tate" 2018) in his piece  Railings  ( 2004), where he walked around the city running a stick along the city’s railings. The borders come alive in a loud stream of clack clacks, amplifying the private’s shield against the public or the public’s barricade on the private. Similarly, Thomson’s  Bronze Spear 1  is the weapon placed in the middle of both sides, invariably confronted. Finally, the railings come alive in Thomson’s performance  If It Starts to Fall , for which he hired a street juggler to throw plaster railing tops around dressed up in a high-visibility suit. Juggling with non-round objects is not easy, turning the performance into a humorous struggle coated in a white plaster mist.  If   It Starts to Fall  challenges the railings’ stillness and literally plays around with its serious violence. It resembles a circus show of flying knives, although in this case the weapons fall and fail, proving to be destroyable, unlike their original twins. Is public and private space being juggled around? Considering the rise of pseudo-public spaces in London – squares and parks that seem public but are actually owned by corporations (Shenker 2018) – Thomson’s performance seems to portray the state of our shared areas accurately’   Art & the Public Sphere 7.1-  Review ‘If it starts to fall move out the way’ Gibberd Gallery

Go - No Go

2019

Railing Spear Series

‘Thomson’s Go, No Go 1 or Bronze Spear 1 are playful sculptures of distorted railings which also reference this ambiguity of the customised public sculpture. (Bronze Spear 1) Made from a cast of a street railing, reverse the process by turning the vandalised public element into a non-public sculpture. Railings are in fact charged with the paradox of being both public and private delineators at the same time. They are the materialised frontiers of the terrain’s ownership, drawing along cities in lines of spears. Belgian artist Francis Alÿs also commented on “the armor of paranoid London” ("‘Railings’, Francis Alÿs, 2004 | Tate" 2018) in his piece Railings ( 2004), where he walked around the city running a stick along the city’s railings. The borders come alive in a loud stream of clack clacks, amplifying the private’s shield against the public or the public’s barricade on the private. Similarly, Thomson’s Bronze Spear 1 is the weapon placed in the middle of both sides, invariably confronted. Finally, the railings come alive in Thomson’s performance If It Starts to Fall, for which he hired a street juggler to throw plaster railing tops around dressed up in a high-visibility suit. Juggling with non-round objects is not easy, turning the performance into a humorous struggle coated in a white plaster mist. If It Starts to Fall challenges the railings’ stillness and literally plays around with its serious violence. It resembles a circus show of flying knives, although in this case the weapons fall and fail, proving to be destroyable, unlike their original twins. Is public and private space being juggled around? Considering the rise of pseudo-public spaces in London – squares and parks that seem public but are actually owned by corporations (Shenker 2018) – Thomson’s performance seems to portray the state of our shared areas accurately’

Art & the Public Sphere 7.1- Review ‘If it starts to fall move out the way’ Gibberd Gallery

Skewered Forms  2019  Skewered Forms Takes the shape of a constructed barbeque. The sculpture makes a democratic relationship between sculpture and its foundation. The base made of threaded rod and wire mesh are the materials used to reinforce foundations - these materials could as well be underground or unseen. The light white skewed forms are suspended above. Alight, the fire consumes weight and mass and makes the sculpture lighter and colours the forms. Skewering the forms is a fixing strategy. A reference to art that is often an attempt to keep objects still. There is a reference to Eduardo Paolozzi ‘Forms on a Rod’ but where this work is a single cast in bronze, ‘Skewered Forms’ are kept as separated elements in different materials, retaining the sculpture within the realms of change.

Skewered Forms

2019

Skewered Forms Takes the shape of a constructed barbeque. The sculpture makes a democratic relationship between sculpture and its foundation. The base made of threaded rod and wire mesh are the materials used to reinforce foundations - these materials could as well be underground or unseen. The light white skewed forms are suspended above. Alight, the fire consumes weight and mass and makes the sculpture lighter and colours the forms. Skewering the forms is a fixing strategy. A reference to art that is often an attempt to keep objects still. There is a reference to Eduardo Paolozzi ‘Forms on a Rod’ but where this work is a single cast in bronze, ‘Skewered Forms’ are kept as separated elements in different materials, retaining the sculpture within the realms of change.